Deutsche Bank proposes 5% ‘privilege’ tax on working from home

  • Working from home should be taxed to help support people on low incomes who cannot do their jobs remotely, Deutsche Bank said Tuesday.
  • People choosing to work from home despite their company providing a permanent desk should pay the tax, at 5% of their salary. If companies do not offer permanent desks, they should pay instead, the report argued.
  • Deutsche said the tax could raise $49 billion per year in the US, 20 billion euros ($23.6 billion) in Germany, and £7 billion ($9.3 billion) in the UK.
  • The bank said an average worker would not be worse off if they paid the tax, because they are saving money on travel, food, and clothes by working remotely.
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Deutsche Bank said Tuesday that people choosing to work from home rather than in an office should be taxed 5% of their salary, with the money used

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Will college students bring Covid-19 home for Thanksgiving?

Weston Kerekes plans to eat his Thanksgiving dinner alone in his childhood bedroom in Santa Monica, California.



a woman walking down a sidewalk: During the final week of August, the University of South Carolina reported a 26.6% positivity rate among the student population tested for Covid-19.


© Sean Rayford/Getty Images/FILE
During the final week of August, the University of South Carolina reported a 26.6% positivity rate among the student population tested for Covid-19.

If all goes as planned, the Yale University freshman’s quarantine will have followed a tightly choreographed trip from his New Haven, Connecticut, campus to ensure he doesn’t expose his parents to Covid-19.

“He’ll take a Covid-19 test 72 hours before he leaves campus and then he will wear an N95 (mask) and goggles from the moment he steps into the airport,” said Erika Kerekes, his mother, who has asthma, high blood pressure and diabetes. “On the plane he won’t eat or drink anything or use the bathroom.”



a man standing in front of a building: Weston Kerekes, a freshman at Yale University, is taking Covid-19 safety precautions seriously so he can return to his family in Santa Monica, California. He'll eat Thanksgiving dinner quarantined in his bedroom.


© Jesse Roy
Weston Kerekes, a freshman at Yale University, is taking Covid-19 safety precautions seriously so he can

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Working From Home? Here’s How To Better Integrate Your Professional And Personal Self

Jennifer Wines, Vice President at Fidelity Private Wealth Management

The acceleration of the work-from-home culture over the past few months has required lots of logistical and emotional gymnastics. Seemingly overnight, we invited our corporate computers into our homes. Many corporate employees, including myself, rearranged their homes and routines to transition to this different mode of working and living. Further, the accelerated adoption of remote work has affected many industries, including my own — finance, an industry traditionally known for its formality and rigid structure.

After a few months of sorting out our new work-from-home routines, we discovered that productivity can in fact happen from the comfort of our homes (some more comfortable than others). Now, with this foundational realization in place, we have a golden opportunity to pivot our attention to a more meaningful challenge, and that is the fuller integration of our professional and personal selves. This

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