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Nordic retreat (holiday residence) designed by Sophie Burke of Sophie Burke Design.
Nordic retreat (holiday residence) designed by Sophie Burke of Sophie Burke Design. Photo by Gillian Stevens Photography /PNG

Something noticeable about her work is how much attention she pays to her clients and how this translates into the interiors she creates for them. There is a sense of intimacy and captured personalities that are conveyed with warmth and without fanfare.

“On most of our projects, we’re working with clients for two to four years. You really get to know them. We want spaces to reflect who lives there, what works for them, and what works for them in terms of functionality. We do a deep dive into their hobbies, likes, passions, how they cook, do they cook with their partner? Or alone? What sports do they like? It just helps develop a full picture,” she says.

This technique makes projects more interesting for Burke and her team, she says, because they don’t want to do the same things over and over. “That would be agonizingly boring, I think.”

Modern farmhouse inspired dining room by Sophie Burke of Sophie Burke Design.
Modern farmhouse inspired dining room by Sophie Burke of Sophie Burke Design. Photo by Gillian Stevens Photography /PNG

This year has been a crazy one, says Burke, and she feels very acutely for good friends who are losing their livelihoods in the restaurant trade due to social distancing. Home renovations, for the most part, she says, have charged ahead.

In fact, a lot of interior designers have been busier than ever this year. With people forced to spend more time at home, they’re using more resources to make their homes more comfortable and appealing.

Areas of the home people are investing in more than ever include home offices, bedrooms and personal wellness areas — a spot to practise yoga in, for example, so they’re not exercising in the middle of their living room.

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