U.S. FDA approves first COVID-19 test kit for home use

The word “COVID-19” is reflected in a drop on a syringe needle in this illustration taken November 9, 2020. REUTERS/Dado Ruvic/Illustration

(Reuters) – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said on Tuesday it had approved the first COVID-19 self-testing kit for home use that provides results within 30 minutes.

The single-use test, made by Lucira Health, has been given emergency use authorization for home use with self-collected nasal swab samples in individuals aged 14 and older who are suspected of COVID-19 by their health care provider, the FDA said.

“While COVID-19 diagnostic tests have been authorized for at-home collection, this is the first that can be fully self-administered and provide results at home,” FDA Commissioner Stephen Hahn said.

The kit can also be used at hospitals and point-of-care settings but samples should be collected by a healthcare provider if the individuals who are tested are younger than 14 years, the

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Everything you need at home in case you or a family member gets COVID-19

Make sure you have these things on hand, just in case. (Photo: Getty Images / Ridofranz)

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

Despite taking the necessary precautions—social distancing, washing hands, wearing a mask in public—there’s still a risk that you or a family member could contract COVID-19. With coronavirus cases on the rise across the country and holiday travel coming up, it’s more important than ever to be prepared if someone you live with gets sick. 

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that most people who contract COVID-19 will only have a mild case and can probably recover at home, there are necessary precautions to take to prevent the spread of the virus in your household. This includes having a designated sick room and bathroom as well as a designated person to care

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Walnut, CA woman fired after getting COVID-19, lawsuit says

A California woman is suing her former employer, alleging that she was fired after testing positive for COVID-19.

Priscilla Perez filed a lawsuit in the Los Angeles Superior Court on Nov. 12 against One Perfect Choice furniture store in Walnut. She is seeking damages from the company after she says they discriminated against her on the basis of disability, intentionally inflicted emotional distress and wrongfully terminated her.

McClatchy News reached out to One Perfect Choice for comment but did not receive a response Monday.

Perez said she tested positive for COVID-19 at the end of June and took time off from her job as an office assistant to recover, according to the lawsuit. When she returned to work, the lawsuit says, her boss “began giving her the runaround” and “told her to file for unemployment benefits.”

Perez’s manager told her the company couldn’t afford to continue employing her, the lawsuit

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Zoom, Peloton, and other ‘stay-at-home’ stocks tumble after Moderna’s COVID-19 vaccine proves extremely effective


  • “Stay-at-home” stocks including Zoom, Etsy, and Peloton tumbled in pre-market trading on Monday after Moderna revealed its COVID-19 vaccine was almost 95% effective in a late-stage trial.
  • Docusign, Wayfair, Fastly, and other stocks that have at least partly benefited from the pandemic also retreated.
  • In contrast, airlines, cruise lines, manufacturers, and other “real economy” stocks jumped as investors wagered the vaccine would allow economies to reopen in a matter of months.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Zoom, Etsy, Peloton, and other “stay-at-home” stocks slumped in pre-market trading on Monday, as positive vaccine news dampened their growth prospects.

Moderna’s announcement that its COVID-19 vaccine proved 94.5% effective in a late-stage trial helped to drive Zoom shares down as much as 7%, Etsy down 6%, and Peloton down 5%.

Netflix, Pinterest, Docusign, Wayfair, Fastly, Chegg, and other companies that have benefited from people spending more time at home

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Schools want to end online classes for struggling kids, but COVID-19 cases may send everyone home

Math teacher Aaron Tomhave found it fairly easy to continue connecting with his students when his district outside of Houston shifted online in March. He’s a tech whiz, and he already had a good relationship with them. 

Internet connectivity problems slow down online learning

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But when the Splendora school district returned to in-person instruction in September, Tomhave noticed subtle differences with his new students: When he rolls up on his mechanic’s stool and asks them about their day and their schoolwork, he gets an authentic and immediate response. He knows that would have been harder over email. His students are grasping concepts more readily in person, too.

“There is a big difference between accountability face to face and accountability online,” said Tomhave, who’s been teaching for about 13 years. 

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Schools want to end online classes for struggling kids. COVID-19 cases may send everyone home.

Math teacher Aaron Tomhave found it fairly easy to continue connecting with his students when his district outside of Houston shifted online in March. He’s a tech whiz, and he already had a good relationship with them. 

Internet connectivity problems slow down online learning

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

But when the Splendora school district returned to in-person instruction in September, Tomhave noticed subtle differences with his new students: When he rolls up on his mechanic’s stool and asks them about their day and their schoolwork, he gets an authentic and immediate response. He knows that would have been harder over email. His students are grasping concepts more readily in person, too.

“There is a big difference between accountability face to face and accountability online,” said Tomhave, who’s been teaching for about 13 years. 

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

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College Students Home For The Holidays, How To Keep Families Safe From COVID-19 : Shots

College students are preparing to travel home for thanksgiving, but the coronavirus is making things complicated. Epidemiologists say there are things families can to do reduce the risk of infection.
College students are preparing to travel home for thanksgiving, but the coronavirus is making things complicated. Epidemiologists say there are things families can to do reduce the risk of infection.

Sandy Kretschmer imagines her son Henry returning home from college, dropping his bags and then giving her a big hug. But she knows the reality of this homecoming may be a lot different.

I’ll probably have a mask on and he’ll have a mask on when I hug him,” she says.

Henry plans to take a COVID-19 test a few days before he leaves Iowa State University where he’s a junior, and he’ll self-quarantine until he heads home to Chicago.

The Kretschmers are taking these precautions because some family members have underlying conditions that put them at higher risk of becoming seriously ill with COVID-19. Henry’s father has an auto-immune disease and his 78-year-old grandfather is in hospice care.

Families all across the country are facing a similar dilemma: They want their students home for Thanksgiving, but no one wants the virus to come home with them.

“I want to

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During Covid-19, Home Depot Made Our Better Angels Shine

2020 has proven to be the most challenging, tumultuous year in modern American history. It has also been a year of learning. We have collectively learned that the vast majority of Americans – most of us — have been vulnerable and are hurting. We in business learned that business and society can no longer exist in segregated, separate spheres. While business has been in part, culpable for our society problems, business can and must lead the path forward to sustainable solutions. I, for one, am optimistic that business will chose the inclusive version of stakeholder capitalism because a good many businesses are already beginning to practice it and are fulfilling the needs of multiple stakeholders.

One such company is Home Depot
HD
where the loyal employees boast of having “orange running through their veins.” 

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6 Tips for In-Person Networking During the Covid-19 Era


8 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


This article was written by Elizabeth Harris, a member of the Entrepreneur NEXT powered by Assemble content team. Entrepreneur NEXT powered by Assemble is freelance matching platform leading the future of work. If you’re struggling to find, vet, and hire the right freelancers for your business, Entrepreneur NEXT will help you hire the freelancers you need, exactly when you need them. From business to marketing, sales, design, finance, and technology, we have the top 3 percent of freelance experts ready to work for you. 

Between video calls, masks, and conversations six-feet apart, the way we interact with each other has changed this year. In a matter of months, millions of people have moved to doing business online, and with the cancellation of face-to-face meetings, events and conferences, the way we network has changed too. 

Restrictions and

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Canada bets on imports as home-grown COVID-19 vaccine heads to large-scale trials

TORONTO (Reuters) – Canada’s reliance on supply contracts to secure COVID-19 vaccines from drugmakers like Pfizer Inc has put daily life for Canadians, and prospects for the economy over the next year, in the hands of a few foreign companies facing overwhelming global demand.

Medicago employees harvest Nicotiana benthamiana plants to extract virus-like particles (VLP) in Medicago’s Durham Facility in Durham, North Carolina, U.S. in an undated photograph. Medicago/Handout via REUTERS.

As other governments pour hundreds of millions or billions into vaccine development, Canada has earmarked C$1 billion ($761 million) to buy doses abroad. Meanwhile, Quebec-based Medicago has worked with a shoestring budget on its home-grown, plant-based vaccine.

Medicago, owned by Japan’s Mitsubishi Tanabe Pharma and tobacco company Philip Morris, reported promising early trial data this week and said on Thursday it plans to begin large-scale studies. The vaccine uses an efficacy booster from GlaxoSmithKline called an adjuvant.

If pivotal

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