Deutsche Bank proposes a 5% tax for people still working from home after the pandemic

  • A Deutsche Bank survey found more than half of workers wanted to continue working from home for the 2-3 days a week after the pandemic.
  • According to the Deutsche Bank Research report, a 5% tax rate on those days on the average salary of a remote worker could raise $48 billion a year in the U.S., £6.9 billion in the U.K. and 15.9 billion euros in Germany.
  • This would cover the costs of grants for people who can’t work from home and are on lower incomes.



a person sitting at a table using a laptop


© Provided by CNBC


A research team at Deutsche Bank proposed that people pay a 5% tax for the “privilege” of working from home, if they continue to do so after the pandemic, as this could subsidize income lost by lower-earners due to the coronavirus crisis. 

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Deutsche Bank thematic strategist Luke Templeman said in the investment bank’s Konzept research report, published Tuesday,

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Capitals’ 2021 calendar features relatable theme, with players at home during pandemic

Since 2014, the Capitals have raised more than $500,000 for the nonprofit pet adoption organization Homeward Trails through sales of an annual canine calendar, featuring photos of players posing with dogs in search of forever homes. The 2021 version of the popular holiday gift has a different theme, with photos submitted by players of themselves passing the time during the coronavirus pandemic in various locations across the globe.



a screen shot of Carl Hagelin, Alexander Ovechkin, Evgeny Kuznetsov, John Carlson, Tom Wilson, Nicklas Backstrom, Justin Schultz posing for a photo: (Courtesy of the Capitals)


(Courtesy of the Capitals)

Every player on the roster is featured in this year’s calendar, which is available online for $20, with all proceeds benefiting the Monumental Sports & Entertainment Foundation. The calendars will be also be available at MedStar Capitals Iceplex beginning Nov. 23, and the team store at Capital One Arena beginning Nov. 24.



Alexander Ovechkin et al. posing for the camera: (Courtesy of the Capitals)


(Courtesy of the Capitals)

The front and back covers of the calendar feature a collage of several players and Captain, the team’s service dog in training,

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For office furniture sellers during a pandemic, there’s no place like home

CHICAGO — Before COVID-19 sent most workers home in March, office furniture resellers took orders for dozens, hundreds or even thousands of items at a time.



a group of people standing around a table: Andrew Sobko, right, and Viktor Tkachuk, left foreground, both with CDL 1000, shop for office workstations with the help of Grisell Feliciano, center, a workspace solutions specialist at Office Furniture Center in Chicago on Nov. 4, 2020.


© Jose M. Osorio/Chicago Tribune/TNS
Andrew Sobko, right, and Viktor Tkachuk, left foreground, both with CDL 1000, shop for office workstations with the help of Grisell Feliciano, center, a workspace solutions specialist at Office Furniture Center in Chicago on Nov. 4, 2020.

But in recent months, many of these businesses instead have been besieged by the weary work-from-home masses who are snapping up one refurbished desk and chair at a time, wrestling the goods into their cars and dragging them home.

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It’s one of many examples of business models changing because of the public health crisis, and it’s an indication that office workers are hunkering down for a much longer stint at home than they initially expected when the office market all

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Staff who work from home after pandemic ‘should pay more tax’

Employees who continue working from home after the pandemic should be taxed for the privilege, with the proceeds used to help lower-paid workers, according to a new report.



a person sitting on a desk: Photograph: MBI/Alamy Stock Photo


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: MBI/Alamy Stock Photo

Related: Working from home ‘damaging Britain’s creative potential and economic wellbeing’

Economists at Deutsche Bank have proposed making staff pay a 5% tax for each day they choose to work remotely. They argue it would leave the average employee no worse off because of savings made by not commuting and not buying lunch on-the-go and fewer purchases of work clothing. Alternatively, the report suggests the tax could be paid by employers who do not provide their workforce with a permanent desk.



a person sitting in a chair: Economists at Deutsche Bank Research propose making staff pay a 5% tax for each day they choose to work remotely.


© Photograph: MBI/Alamy Stock Photo
Economists at Deutsche Bank Research propose making staff pay a 5% tax for each day they choose to work remotely.

The report from the German lender’s economic

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‘Songs From Home’ by Fred Hersch Review: Adapting an Artform to a Pandemic

In jazz, live and recorded music are forever engaged in an intricate pas-de-deux. The improvisations in front of flesh-and-blood audiences are where the magic happens. Yet without the technology of audio reproduction, all would be lost the instant after each note was created and heard.

This is the standard “creation model” of nearly all jazz: Performances for a live audience are the main event, and recordings—whether made then or in the studio—are necessary yet secondary. But pianist Fred Hersch has devised a new approach in which the music is both created and listened to in social isolation. His new solo album, “Songs From Home,” shows that musicians of Mr. Hersch’s high caliber not only refuse to be stopped by the pandemic, but, in this case at least, can be inspired by it.

If Pandemic Jazz is a new musical genre, it is one defined not only by the circumstances

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How a furniture upholsterer managed to grow her business in a pandemic

  • Designer Nicole Crowder uses traditional techniques and her own unique taste to upholster furniture by hand.
  • Her business has grown, despite the pandemic, as people in her hometown of Washington and beyond discover her.
  • Crowder charges between $900 and $2,200 for each custom upholstery piece, and she’s starting to make her own original pieces.
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Every piece of furniture tells a story for Nicole Crowder.

The Washington, DC, designer hand-makes custom upholstery using traditional techniques, even though most furniture nowadays is mass-produced in factories.

“I think a lot about preservation, you know. How do you take care of something?” Crowder told Business Insider Today. “And I don’t have children, so I think my furniture has become my children. It’s something that I really have to take my time nurturing from start to finish.”

Crowder started her upholstery business in her small Washington

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First they lost their jobs in the pandemic. Then a wildfire burned their home.

James Goodrich and his husband, Jason Kramer, both 44, moved to Talent, Ore., almost two years ago to work in the costume department of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

Together for 17 years and married for six, they lost their jobs in April when the coronavirus pandemic shuttered theaters and live performances.

The loss was like a terrible breakup, Jason said. Uncertain about the future, the couple tried to cling to normalcy by making a daily schedule — Jason, who likes to go food shopping, was the only person who left the house.

“The pandemic made us more resilient,” Jason said. “We realized we had each other and needed to rely on ourselves, which was really kind of daunting.”

The couple were relying on savings and a small side business when, five months later, the Almeda wildfire destroyed their home and much of their town. They fled with their passports, marriage

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For office furniture sellers during a pandemic, there’s no place like home

Before COVID-19 sent most Chicago workers home in March, office furniture resellers took orders for dozens, hundreds or even thousands of items at a time.

But in recent months, local businesses like Rework and the Office Furniture Center instead have been besieged by the weary work-from-home masses who are snapping up one refurbished desk and chair at a time, wrestling the goods into their cars and dragging them home.

It’s one of many examples of business models changing because of the public health crisis, and it’s an indication that office workers are hunkering down for a much longer stint at home than they initially expected when the downtown Chicago office market all but shut down eight months ago.

Rework has seen noncorporate walk-in and online orders increase to about $100,000 per month, from a pre-pandemic monthly average of $3,000, said Mark Knepper, one of the company’s owners. Business has picked

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Historic Concordia Ballroom uses pandemic downtime for remodeling

LA CROSSE, Wis. – (WXOW) – First established in 1891 as a German singing society, the Concordia Ballroom has become a huge part of La Crosse’s history.

Due to the pandemic, they had to close temporarily.

That’s when they decided to make big changes inside the building.

Before the pandemic, the Concordia Ballroom hosted various events from birthday parties to weddings, and Sunday dancing. They have a long history of polka dancing. The facility had a very full calendar of dancing and weddings planned that had to be cancelled.

There is a board made up of seven people that make decisions and help operate the Concordia Ballroom. With events being cancelled, they also returned all of the deposits that were made as well. Luckily, the mortgage on the building has been paid off for many years explained David Ford, Concordia Ballroom Volunteer. They have also received grants and a small

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