California to impose regional stay-at-home orders as coronavirus cases surge

California Governor Gavin Newsom on Thursday said he would issue a regional stay-at-home order in areas facing ICU bed shortages as COVID-19 cases surge across the state. “We are pulling that emergency brake,” Newsom said in a news conference Thursday.

The measure forces a three-week closure of all bars, wineries, hair salons and barbershops in regions where ICU beds have reached 15% capacity. Retail stores will be allowed to operate at 20% capacity, while restaurants will be limited to takeout and delivery service only. Non-essential travel will be restricted.

“This is the final surge in this pandemic,” Newsom said. “There is a light at the end of the tunnel.”

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Newsom to impose regional stay-at-home order to ease hospitalizations

California governor Gavin Newsom

Rich Pedroncelli | Pool | AP

California will impose a limited stay-at-home order on certain regions of the state where Covid-19 cases are placing a strain on intensive care units, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Thursday.

The state will be split into five regions — the Bay Area, Greater Sacramento, Northern California, San Joaquin Valley and Southern California. If the remaining ICU capacity in a region falls below 15%, it will trigger a three-week stay-at-home order, Newsom said.

The order would require bars, wineries, personal services, hair salons and barbershops to temporarily close. Personal services are businesses like nail salons, tattoo parlors and body waxing, according to the state’s website. Schools that meet the state’s health requirements and critical infrastructure would be allowed to remain open, and retail stores could operate at 20% capacity and restaurants would be allowed to offer take-out and delivery, the Democratic governor

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Why California Is Issuing Stay-At-Home Orders Because Of Covid-19 Coronavirus

Running out of toilet paper is one thing. Running out of intensive care unit (ICU) beds is something completely different.

With the Covid-19 coronavirus continuing to surge, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) is now projecting that the state will run out of ICU beds by mid-December. That, obviously, is not a good thing and can’t be solved by simply buying more beds. As a result, on Thursday, the CDPH announced a “Regional Stay-At-Home Order”, which will remain in place for at least the next three weeks.

This Order doesn’t mean that all Californians have to stay at home just yet. Rather, it established thresholds that once crossed will trigger stay-at-home orders. In

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Rollout plans for stay-at-home orders and vaccine distribution explained

Stay-at-home orders are expected in many parts of California in the coming days and weeks in what Gov. Gavin Newsom calls the “final surge” of the coronavirus pandemic. And, while public health officials warn of a “surge within a surge” following the Thanksgiving holiday, firefighters were battling a 7,200-acre fire in Orange County — a sign that “wildfire season” isn’t quite over. Plus: Which health care workers will be vaccinated first? And, another mysterious work of art pops up in the West. 



a sign on the side of the street: A sign advising people to stay home due to COVID-19 concerns is shown at a MUNI bus stop in San Francisco, Thursday, April 2, 2020.


© Jeff Chiu, AP
A sign advising people to stay home due to COVID-19 concerns is shown at a MUNI bus stop in San Francisco, Thursday, April 2, 2020.

Hi, there. I’m Maria Sestito, senior issues reporter for The Desert Sun in Palm Springs. Today is Thursday, Dec. 3 and, thankfully, I already bought my toilet paper for this month. If you haven’t, don’t panic — there are

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California governor introduces new stay-at-home order amid Covid surge

California Gov. Gavin Newsom introduced a new regional stay-at-home order Thursday, days after he said most of the state’s intensive care beds could be over capacity within weeks as coronavirus case numbers surge.

The order, which will be applied by region, will require bars, wineries, hair salons and other nonessential businesses across five areas to close for three weeks once a region’s intensive care capacity falls below 15 percent, he said.

Statewide travel will also be temporarily halted, Newsom said, but schools will remain open, and he encouraged people to visit parks and exercise.

Restaurants can continue to

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Biden wants 100 days of mask-wearing; California set for new stay-at-home order; US passes 14 million cases

The nation’s one-day toll of coronavirus deaths surpassed 3,000 for the first time Wednesday and on Thursday the U.S. recorded its 14 millionth COVID-19 case, milestones showing the pandemic continues to race out of control.

COVID-19 vaccines are on the horizon for the U.S., so what are the potential side effects?

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The death toll of 3,157 came as hospitalizations surpassed 100,000 for the first time. The country has recored 1 million more cases of the virus in less than a week.

However, the daily death number may be inflated by fatalities reported days late because of the Thanksgiving holiday. Even so, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicted the U.S. could reach 450,000 deaths by February.

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“The reality is, December and January and February are going

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California to Issue Regional Stay-at-Home Orders

California is preparing to issue new stay-at-home orders based on hospital capacity in five regions of the state, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Wednesday.

The orders will be issued once a region’s hospital intensive care unit availability drops below 15%. The orders, which will last three weeks, will mandate the closure of all non-essential businesses, including indoor dining and beauty salons, the Democrat said.

Mr. Newsom said he expects to issue the orders for Southern California, Northern California, Greater Sacramento, and the central San Joaquin Valley in the next week. A stay-at-home order for the San Francisco Bay Area will likely come in mid-late December if current trends continue, he said.

“If we don’t act now our hospital system will be overwhelmed,” Mr. Newsom said, adding that he was “pulling the emergency brake” on the state’s reopening plan to stem the tide of Covid-19 spread.

Mr. Newsom said schools that have

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California Is Days Away From A Regional Stay-At-Home Order : NPR

A minimum 3-week stay-at-home order is expected in California as hospitals experience an unprecedented surge in intensive care COVID-19 patients.

Jae C. Hong/AP


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Jae C. Hong/AP

A minimum 3-week stay-at-home order is expected in California as hospitals experience an unprecedented surge in intensive care COVID-19 patients.

Jae C. Hong/AP

California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday announced most of the state will come under a stricter set of limitations as intensive care units reach near-capacity levels with the latest pandemic surge in coronavirus cases.

Regional stay-at-home orders will likely go into effect “in the next day or two” in places with less than 15% ICU availability, Newsom said in a daily briefing with reporters.

Once it is triggered, the order will remain effect for at least three weeks. It will be lifted when ICU capacity becomes more available.

The plan prohibits private gatherings of any size, closes

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Newsom issues regional stay-at-home order based on ICU capacity to battle record Covid surge in California

Millions of Californians may soon find themselves under a regional stay-at-home order once again under new restrictions announced Thursday by California Gov. Gavin Newsom.



a group of people in a room: FILE - In this Nov. 19, 2020, file photo, medical personnel prone a COVID-19 patient at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in the Mission Hills section of Los Angeles. The raging coronavirus pandemic has prompted Los Angeles County to impose a lockdown to prevent the caseload from spiraling into a hospital crisis but the order stops short of a full business shutdown that could cripple the holiday sale season. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)


© Jae C. Hong/AP
FILE – In this Nov. 19, 2020, file photo, medical personnel prone a COVID-19 patient at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in the Mission Hills section of Los Angeles. The raging coronavirus pandemic has prompted Los Angeles County to impose a lockdown to prevent the caseload from spiraling into a hospital crisis but the order stops short of a full business shutdown that could cripple the holiday sale season. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

The new stay-at-home order will take hold in regions where hospitals are feeling the squeeze on capacity to treat the incoming surge of Covid-19 patients. A strict stay-at home order will go into effect 48 hours after hospital intensive care unit capacity drops below 15% in one of

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California to impose regional stay-at-home orders amid virus surge

California Governor Gavin Newsom on Thursday said he would issue a regional stay-at-home order in areas facing ICU bed shortages as COVID-19 cases surge across the state. “We are pulling that emergency brake,” Newsom said in a news conference Thursday. 



a man wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Gov. Gavin Newsom, Dodger Stadium, Secretary of State (CA) Alex Padilla, Dodger owner Peter Guber, Dodger President/CEO Stan Kasten, and Fernando Valenzuela


© Carolyn Cole
Gov. Gavin Newsom, Dodger Stadium, Secretary of State (CA) Alex Padilla, Dodger owner Peter Guber, Dodger President/CEO Stan Kasten, and Fernando Valenzuela

The measure forces a three-week closure of all bars, wineries, hair salons and barbershops in regions where ICU beds have reached 15% capacity. Retail stores will be allowed to operate at 20% capacity, while restaurants will be limited to takeout and delivery service only. Non-essential travel will be restricted.

“This is the final surge in this pandemic,” Newsom said. “There is a light at the end of the tunnel.”

There are less than 2,000 available ICU beds left in the state, with over 1,800

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